Kemet Announces New Innovation Center

October 2, 2013 Ė FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PERKINS LAW FIRM CLIENT KEMET ANNOUNCES
FIRST-TO-MARKET HIGH VIBRATION SCREW TERMINAL CAPACITORS

Greenville-based Kemet Electronics Corporation, a leading global supplier of electronic components, recently announced the opening of its new Electrolytic Innovation Center (EIC) in Weymouth, U.K. The inaugural products from this leading-edge facility include first-to-market 20 g High Vibration Screw Terminal capacitors as well as a Low Inductance product line extension.

KEMET began work on this dedicated aluminum electrolytic capacitor technology facility in November 2012 as part of the company's Film and Electrolytic Business restructuring effort. The EIC combines the resources of numerous departments such as Research and Development, Quality and Product Management, providing worldwide support for KEMET customers and manufacturing locations.

"Innovation and collaboration in the development of new electrolytic capacitor technologies are at the heart of the EIC," said Bob Willoughby, Vice President of Film and Electrolytic Business Group. "KEMET's goal is to work closely with our customers to continually challenge the boundaries of electrolytic capacitors and develop tomorrow's technologies today, tailored to specific requirements."

The newly-formed EIC team's initial work has resulted in a first-to-market screw terminal capacitor capable of withstanding vibration of up to 20 g. Primarily developed for inverters in the automotive, aerospace and alternative energy applications, this breakthrough technology extends the industries in which electrolytic capacitors can operate. The high vibration capabilities will further enhance the KEMET ALS 32/33 and ALS 42/43 product families.

Additionally, the EIC team has produced a low inductance screw terminal capacitor that addresses internal voltage peaks in frequency converters used in inverter and motor drive applications. As an extension of the ALS 30/31 Series, these capacitors reduce the inherent inductance in electrolytic capacitors by as much as 40% which lowers voltage and allows the use of lower-rated, lower-cost associated circuitry.

Read more here.